35-33 | South and Southeast Asian Art

Sculpture - Thai

Standing Buddha, 7th-8th century C.E.
Thai

Gray limestone
51 1/2 x 18 x 6 inches (130.81 x 45.72 x 15.24 cm)

Purchase: William Rockhill Nelson Trust

Gallery Location: 225

Gallery Label

Gallery Label
Standing Buddha Northern Thailand, found near Chiang Mai Dvaravati period (ca. 500–900 C.E.), 7th–8th century Mon-Dvaravati style Gray limestone This standing Buddha was sculpted at a time when artists in Southeast Asia transformed Indian religious and artistic ideas into powerful new forms that became the foundation of their art. It is an excellent example of the early Dvaravati style that developed in Thailand. The Buddha’s close-fitting robe without folds, the broad shoulders and the calm, downcast expression reveal the influences of the Gupta-era artistic traditions of Sarnath, India. However, the Buddha’s facial features resemble those of Central Thailand’s indigenous Mon people. The most important Mon Kingdom was Dvaravati which flourished from the 7th–11th centuries. Purchase: William Rockhill Nelson Trust, 35-33

Gallery Label
Standing Buddha Found near Chiang Mai, North Thailand Pre-Thai art, Dvaravati style, 7th–8th century Gray limestone

Before the Thai people gained political supremacy, much of their current area was occupied by Mons, who were primarily Buddhist. The most important Mon kingdom was Dvaravati, which dates from approximately the 7th to the 11th century, and was centered in the river valleys of Central Thailand. This standing Buddha is an early example. The closefitting robe without folds, the broad shoulders, and the slight f lex of the body are post-Gupta inf luences from Sarnath, India. The characteristics of the face are Mon.

Purchase: Nelson Trust, 35-33

Gallery Label
Standing Buddha 7th-8th century

Grey limestone 51-1/2 x 18 x 6 inches (130.7 x 45.7 x 15.2 cm) Found near Chiang Mai, North Thailand Pre-Thai art, Dvaravati style Purchase: Nelson Trust [35-33]

Before the Thai people gained political supremacy, much of their current area was occupied by Mons, who were primarily Buddhist. The most important Mon kingdom was Dvaravati, which dates from approximately the 7th to the 11th century, and was centered in the river valleys of Central Thailand. This standing figure is an early example of Buddhist art from this region. The close-fitting robe without folds, the broad shoulders and the slight flex of the body show strong influences from Sarnath, India. The characteristics of the face, however, are Mon.

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